Categories

The Art of Apprenticeship: Biggie

By Patricia Pitner on July 13, 2017

Share

 

Hello Biggie! Let’s start with your background. What did you do before deciding to become an apprentice?Hi there! Is this a background check? Hahaha! Let’s just say that I had a lot of jobs before becoming a tattoo apprentice, from washing dishes to working my ass in a suit for a corporate company.

What’s your history with art/drawing?
I never followed anything similar to an art school. Not that I didn’t want to, but couldn’t afford to go to one and I was too lazy to study in order to get a scholarship. But I remember that when I was a small boy I used to draw the characters from the Jungle Book and Dragon Ball Z each and every day, with each episode I used to see that day. I was obsessed with them. During middle school I didn’t draw anything, until high school where I was kind of forced to draw nuts and bolts and other mechanical components, due to my high school profile.

 

 

When did you get your first tattoo? Do you still have it?
My first tattoo I had done at the age of 15 by my friend, and at the moment my master Teo aka Texmotherkckrtex and I still have it, so far, well kept on my back. Not so pleased with the imagination I had back then.

What made you decide you want to become a tattoo artist?
Hahhaha nice question. I didn’t decide to become a tattoo artist. I decided to learn how to do tattoos and kind of master my drawing skills.
There’s a long way from having some basic knowledge of drawing and becoming a tattoo artist.

 

 

You became an apprentice this January. Tell us a bit about your experience so far – the struggles and joys of being a tattoo apprentice.
This January I became an apprentice and its been a blast not knowing anything about tattoos except that they are made with a needle and they go on your skin for life.
Its been by far the best experience I had, in terms of learning, an abundance of information to absorb in such a short time and this is just the beginning. Sweat and tears, a good amount of knowledge, one good master and a whole crew that guided me to what I’ve become so far. (Thank you Machina Electrica Team!)

What do you usually do when you’re at the salon? 
When I don’t help the guys with prepping, I draw, most of the times, I take notes ( mentally ) and I closely look at what they are tattooing and how they tattoo. Maybe it sounds boring but for me, it isn’t.

 

 

Do you have a specific style you want to pursue?
I sure have a style or I try to follow one, but so far I don’t know how to call it or if it has a name. Graphic style with a lot of lines involved, not so many shadows, nothing in order but with a lot of meaning to me, some kind of combination between cubism, surrealism and linearism, with a twist.

Is there a type/style of tattoo you would never ever want to do?
Hmmmm…. interesting question. I like a lot of styles, but probably something that I will never tattoo or draw will be photo-realistic tattoos. In my opinion it takes a lot of time and knowledge, not that other styles don’t require that, but its something that I will rather appreciate in a picture or on someone’s skin than struggle with learning how to do that.

 

Which are you favorite tattoo artists at the moment? Did any of them inspire you in some way?
I don’t have a favorite tattoo artist at this moment, but i like Matt Curzon from Australia, the guys from Barbe Rousse tattoo from Bordeaux, Chaim Machlev from Berlin and Kike Esteras from Barcelona.

Do you think it’s important, as a tattooist to do only original and unique work?
If you would ask Dali to paint a Monet and assuming that he would agree, it would sell as a Dali or as a Monet? Its important to create your own style and be recognized in time by your works and style.

What word of advice would you give to somebody thinking about becoming a tattoo artist?
Stay humble and hustle hard.

You can follow Biggie to keep up with his work here, and TheVandalList here.

Share