Tattoo Talks: Tattoo Aftercare

Tattoo Talks: Tattoo Aftercare

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The process of getting a tattoo definitely requires a lot of research and patience, but what about after getting it done? What about aftercare? Of course, you can just ask your tattoo artist what he/she recommends and just go with it, but with all these new brands and new products, how do you know you made the right decision? The best decision for your new tattoo?

I’ve always wondered what is in these tattoo aftercare products,  what every ingredient means ( I mean… do you know what “benzophenone-4” means, from the top of your head? didn’t think so.) and what exactly does it do for you. So I decided to research them (so you won’t have to). Here’s a list of the most known tattoo aftercare products and what’s in them.

 

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Let’s start with Bepanthen.

Which I think it’s the most widely used product for tattoo aftercare because it’s easy to find and kind of cheap.

Active ingredient: Dexpanthenol 5% – D-panthenol is the enantiomer (meaning “opposite”) of Panthenol. This medication is used as a moisturizer to treat or prevent dry, rough, scaly, itchy skin and minor skin irritations. Emollients are substances that soften and moisturize the skin and decrease the itching and flaking.

 

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Inactive Ingredients:

Wool fat  – is a wax secreted by the sebaceous glands of wool-bearing animals. Lanolin used by humans comes from domestic sheep breeds that are raised specifically for their wool. It is insoluble in water and its role in nature is to protect the wool and skin against ravages of climate and the environment, and it seems to play a role in skin hygiene.  Wool fat is closely allied to the natural secretions of the skin; recent experiments show that, in the pure state, it is not very readily absorbed, but when mixed with an equal quantity of olive oil or soft paraffin it readily penetrates the skin and is useful for promoting the cutaneous absorption of drugs.

Waterwe all know this one…

Paraffin LiquidOr mineral oil is a transparent, colorless, odorless, or almost odorless, oily liquid composed of saturated hydrocarbons obtained from petroleum. It is part of the emollient and softener drug class. It cannot become a solid and clog pores.

White Vaseline – a type of petroleum jelly used as an ointment and lubricant.

Almond Oil – Also known as sweet almond oil, this is a non-volatile, non-fragrant oil extracted from the seeds of almonds and used as an emollient. Almond oil is a rich source of skin-repairing ingredients including triglycerides and several fatty acids (oleic, linoleic, and mystic among them).

Protegin X – Lanolin absorption and emulsifier base

White Wax – White beeswax is used in the preparation of emollient ointments.

Cetyl Alcohol – Fatty alcohol used as an emollient, emulsifier, thickener, and carrying agent for other ingredients. Can be derived naturally, as in coconut fatty alcohol, or synthetically. It is not an irritant and is not related to SD alcohol, denatured alcohol, or ethyl alcohol.

Stearyl Alcohol – Fatty alcohol used as an emollient and to help keep other ingredients intact in a formulation. Not to be confused with the drying, irritating types of alcohol such as SD alcohol or denatured alcohol.

 

 

 

Next, we have Hustle ButterCruelty-free & certified vegan. Petroleum free, Paraben free. All natural.

 

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Shea Butter – Plant lipid, extracted from the karite tree, that is used as an emollient in cosmetics. Shea butter is a rich source of antioxidants, including epicatechin gallate, gallocatechin, epigallocatechin, gallocatechin gallate, and epigallocatechin gallate, as well as quercetin.

Mango Butter – Plant-based emollient as it is a rich source of fatty acids and anti-inflammatory ingredients.

Aloe Butter – Aloe butter is a proprietary “butter” developed exclusively for cosmetic purposes. Aloe butter is an extract of aloe vera. There is research indicating that isolated components of aloe vera, such as glycoprotein, can have some effectiveness for wound healing and as an anti-irritant. However, when mixed into a cosmetic product, it is doubtful that those qualities remain, although it may still play a role in binding moisture to skin.

Coconut Oil – Non-volatile plant kernel oil whose high saturated fat content has emollient properties for skin. Coconut oil is a rich source of medium-chain fatty acids, also known as medium-chain triglycerides. Used by itself as a moisturizer, coconut oil’s effectiveness is similar to that of mineral oil.

Sunflower Oil – Non-volatile, non-fragrant plant oil used as an emollient in cosmetics. Sunflower seed oil has the ability to help repair skin’s barrier and reduce inflammation. It’s a rich source of fatty acids skin can use, including linoleic acid, and is excellent for dry skin.

Rice Bran Oil – Emollient oil similar to other non-fragrant plant oils.

Rosemary Oleoresin – Extract that can have antioxidant benefit for skin, but its aromatic components can cause irritation or sensitizing reactions. However, in most skincare products the amount of rosemary extract is unlikely to be a risk, and rosemary extract is much less of a problem for skin than rosemary oil because the extract usually doesn’t contain much, if any, of rosemary oil’s fragrance components.

Green tea – Most researchers agree that tea (black, green, or white) has potent anti-inflammatory properties and that it is a potent antioxidant whether consumed orally or applied topically. Current research also indicates that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), green tea’s active component, can prevent collagen breakdown and reduce UV damage to skin, which is a very good reason to use skincare products that contain one or more forms of tea.

Vitamin E Complex – One of the most well-known and researched antioxidants, both when taken orally and when used in skincare products. If there were an antioxidant hall of fame, vitamin E would likely be its inaugural member (though do not take that to mean it is the “best” antioxidant—there is no single best, just lots of great options). It’s fat-soluble and available in various forms; the most biologically active form is alpha-tocopherol.

Mint Arvenis Essential Oil – Can be a skin irritant and cause contact dermatitis.

 

 

 

 

The H2Ocean Aquatat Tattoo Ointment

Active Ingredient: Petrolatum 41% – Petroleum jelly, petrolatum, white petrolatum, soft paraffin/ Paraffin wax or multi-hydrocarbon,  is a semi-solid mixture of hydrocarbons (with carbon numbers mainly higher than 25), originally promoted as a topical ointment for its healing properties. It temporarily protects minor cuts, scrapes, and burns; protects and helps relieve chapped or cracked skin and lips; helps protect from the drying effects of wind and cold weather.

 

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Inactive Ingredients:

Isopropyl palmitate – Thickening agent and emollient as used in cosmetics. As is true for any emollient or thickening agents, it can potentially clog pores, depending on the amount of the product and your skin’s response.

Ceresin –  Derived from clay, ceresin is a waxy ingredient used as a thickening agent in cosmetics. It can be sensitizing for some skin types.

Lanolin Alcohol – Emollient derived from lanolin. Despite the “alcohol” in the name, this ingredient is not a skin irritant. Instead, it’s a fatty alcohol that can greatly benefit dry skin because it helps prevent moisture loss and maintain a supple feel on the skin.

Panthenol – Alcohol form of the B vitamin pantothenic acid. Panthenol is used in skincare products as a humectant because of its ability to attract and hold moisture. Sometimes called pro-vitamin B5, panthenol mixes readily with many different types of ingredients, making it a versatile ingredient to be used in formulas because it improves skin’s barrier function and maintains the proliferation of fibroblasts, the cells that create collagen.

Bisabolol – Anti-irritant typically extracted from chamomile, but also derived synthetically. Bisabolol reduces pro-inflammatory cytokine production and ameliorates skin inflammation.

 

 

 

Next, we have another “natural, petroleum free, lanolin free and mineral oil free” product:

Tattoo Goo.

 

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Olive oil – Emollient plant oil with benefits similar to those of several other non-fragrant plant oils. Olive oil is beneficial for dry skin because of its fatty acid content, some of which comes from the emollient squalene. Olive oil contains essential fatty acids dry skin needs, including oleic, palmitic, and linoleic acids. It also contains phenolic compounds that provide antioxidant benefit.

Beeswax – It is a thickening agent that has some emollient properties.

Cocoa Butter – Oil extracted from cocoa beans, used as an emollient and with properties similar to those of other non-fragrant plant oils. Cocoa butter is a rich source of antioxidant polyphenols; in vitro research shows it helps improve skin elasticity and promotes healthy collagen production.

Wheat Germ Oil – Emollient plant oil similar to all nonfragrant plant oils.

Tocopheryl  acetate – Vitamin E – One of the most well-known and researched antioxidants, both when taken orally and when used in skincare products. If there were an antioxidant hall of fame, vitamin E would likely be its inaugural member (though do not take that to mean it is the “best” antioxidant—there is no single best, just lots of great options). It’s fat-soluble and available in various forms; the most biologically active form is alpha-tocopherol.

Lavender Oil – Widely used the plant that’s a member of the mint family. Primarily a fragrance ingredient, although it may have antibacterial properties. In-vitro research indicates that components of lavender, specifically linalool and linalyl acetate, can be cytotoxic, which means that topical application of as little a concentration as 0.25% causes cell death. The fragrance constituents in lavender oil, linalool, and linalyl acetate oxidize when exposed to air, and in this process their potential for causing an allergic reaction is increased. If you’re wondering why lavender oil doesn’t appear to be problematic for you, it’s because research has demonstrated that you don’t always need to see it or feel it happening for your skin to suffer damage.

Sunflower Oil – Non-volatile, non-fragrant plant oil used as an emollient in cosmetics. Sunflower seed oil has the ability to help repair skin’s barrier and reduce inflammation. It’s a rich source of fatty acids skin can use, including linoleic acid, and is excellent for dry skin.

Rosemary extract – Extract that can have antioxidant benefit for skin, but its aromatic components can cause irritation or sensitizing reactions. However, in most skincare products the amount of rosemary extract is unlikely to be a risk, and rosemary extract is much less of a problem for skin than rosemary oil because the extract usually doesn’t contain much, if any, of rosemary oil’s fragrance components.

D&C green #6 – Type of coloring agent. According to the FDA, when Ext. D&C is followed by a color, it means that the color is certified as safe for use only in drugs and cosmetics to be used externally, but not around the eyes or mouth.

 

 

 

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At number 5 we have the Sorry Mom Tattoo Balm

Aqua – Water

Lanolin – Emollient, very thick substance derived from the sebaceous glands of sheep. Lanolin has long been burdened with a reputation for being an allergen or sensitizing agent, which has always been a disappointment to formulators because lanolin is such an effective moisturizing ingredient. A study in the British Journal of Dermatology concluded: “that lanolin sensitization has remained at a relatively low and constant rate even in a high-risk population (i.e., patients with recent or active eczema).”

Paraffinum LiquidumOr mineral oil is a transparent, colorless, odorless, or almost odorless, oily liquid composed of saturated hydrocarbons obtained from petroleum. It is part of the emollient and softener drug class. It cannot become a solid and clog pores.

Panthenol – Alcohol form of the B vitamin pantothenic acid. Panthenol is used in skincare products as a humectant because of its ability to attract and hold moisture. Sometimes called pro-vitamin B5, panthenol mixes readily with many different types of ingredients, making it a versatile ingredient to be used in formulas because it improves skin’s barrier function and maintains the proliferation of fibroblasts, the cells that create collagen.

PetrolatumPetroleum jelly, petrolatum, white petrolatum, soft paraffin/ Paraffin wax or multi-hydrocarbon,  is a semi-solid mixture of hydrocarbons (with carbon numbers mainly higher than 25), originally promoted as a topical ointment for its healing properties. It temporarily protects minor cuts, scrapes, and burns; protects and helps relieve chapped or cracked skin and lips; helps protect from the drying effects of the wind and cold weather.

OzokeriteMineral wax used as a thickening agent in cosmetics, especially to add stability to lipsticks and stick foundations and keep them blended.

Prunus Amygdalus Dulcis Oil – Also known as sweet almond oil, this is a non-volatile, non-fragrant oil extracted from the seeds of almonds and used as an emollient. Almond oil is a rich source of skin-repairing ingredients including triglycerides and several fatty acids (oleic, linoleic, and myristic among them).

Glycerin – Also called glycerol or glycerine, glycerin is present in all natural lipids (fats), whether animal or vegetable. It can be derived from natural substances by hydrolysis of fats and by fermentation of sugars; it also can be synthetically manufactured. Glycerin is a skin-identical and skin-repairing ingredient, meaning it is a substance found naturally in the skin. In that respect, it is one of the many substances in skin that help maintain the outer barrier and prevent dryness or scaling. Research shows that a combination of ingredients, including glycerin, dimethicone, petrolatum, antioxidants, fatty acids, lecithin, among many others, are excellent for helping skin heal, reducing associated dermatitis, and restoring normal barrier function if used on an ongoing basis.

Glyceryl Oleate – Mixture of portions of glycerin and oleic acid used as an emollient, surfactant, emulsifier, and  (less often) a fragrance ingredient in cosmetics. Maybe plant- or animal-derived or synthetic.

Lanolin Alcohol – Emollient derived from lanolin. Despite the “alcohol” in the name, this ingredient is not a skin irritant. Instead, it’s a fatty alcohol that can greatly benefit dry skin because it helps prevent moisture loss and maintain a supple feel on the skin.

Cera Alba – It is a thickening agent that has some emollient properties, and is often used in lip balms.

Hydrogenated Castor Oil – Emollient ingredient that is a mixture of polyethylene glycol (PEG) with castor oil.

Magnesium Sulfate – Commonly known as Epsom salt, a magnesium salt used as a thickening agent.

Calendula Officinalis flower extractExtract derived from the plant commonly known as pot marigold or Calendula officinalis, there is little research showing that it has any effect on skin, though it may have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties.

Hippophae Rhamnoides Fruit Extractaka Sea Buckthorn – The fruit of this plant contains malic and acetic acids as well as beneficial compounds known as flavonoids, plus fatty oils. Sea buckthorn is a rich source of vitamin C, but most of it is lost when the fruit is processed for production (which includes manufacture for use in cosmetics products). Sea buckthorn is believed to have several topical benefits, but the most convincing are the research pertaining to sea buckthorn’s ability to help skin heal when applied to wounds, and it does appear to have some antioxidant ability.

Rosmarinus Officinalis Leaf Extract – Extract that can have antioxidant benefit for skin, but its aromatic components can cause irritation or sensitizing reactions. However, in most skincare products the amount of rosemary extract is unlikely to be a risk, and rosemary extract is much less of a problem for skin than rosemary oil because the extract usually doesn’t contain much, if any, of rosemary oil’s fragrance components.

Phenoxyethanol – Common cosmetics preservative that’s considered one of the least irritating for use in formulations.

 

 

 

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TattooMed After tattooNot tested on animals, 100% Vegan, Paraben free.

Aqua – Water

Cetearyl Alcohol – Fatty alcohol used as an emollient, emulsifier, thickener, and carrying agent for other ingredients. Can be derived naturally, as in coconut fatty alcohol, or synthetically.

Panthenol – Alcohol form of the B vitamin pantothenic acid. Panthenol is used in skincare products as a humectant because of its ability to attract and hold moisture. Sometimes called pro-vitamin B5, panthenol mixes readily with many different types of ingredients, making it a versatile ingredient to be used in formulas because it improves skin’s barrier function and maintains the proliferation of fibroblasts, the cells that create collagen.

Paraffinum LiquidumOr mineral oil is a transparent, colorless, odorless, or almost odorless, oily liquid composed of saturated hydrocarbons obtained from petroleum. It is part of the emollient and softener drug class. It cannot become a solid and clog pores.

Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride – Derived from coconut oil and glycerin, it’s considered an excellent emollient and skin-repairing ingredient. It’s included in cosmetics due to its mix of fatty acids that skin can use to repair its surface and resist moisture loss. Caprylic/capric triglyceride can also function as a thickener, but its chief job is to moisturize and replenish skin. This ingredient’s value for skin is made greater by the fact that it’s considered non-sensitizing.

Sodium Cetearyl Sulfate – A mixture of stearyl and cetyl sulfate that functions as a surfactant. (Surfactants are compounds that lower the surface tension (or interfacial tension) between two liquids or between a liquid and a solid. Surfactants may act as detergents, wetting agents, emulsifiers, foaming agents, and dispersants.)

Sodium Polyacrylate – Versatile, a synthetic polymer used as a film-forming agent, stabilizer, absorbent, thickening agent, and emollient.

Tocopheryl Acetate – Vitamin E – One of the most well-known and researched antioxidants, both when taken orally and when used in skincare products. If there were an antioxidant hall of fame, vitamin E would likely be its inaugural member (though do not take that to mean it is the “best” antioxidant—there is no single best, just lots of great options). It’s fat-soluble and available in various forms; the most biologically active form is alpha-tocopherol.

Phenoxyethanol – Common cosmetics preservative that’s considered one of the least irritating for use in formulations.

Propylene Glycol – Along with other glycols and glycerol, this is a humectant or humidifying and delivery ingredient used in cosmetics. In cosmetics, propylene glycol is used only in the smallest amounts to keep products from melting in high heat or from freezing. It also helps active ingredients penetrate the skin.

Decylene Glycol – A synthetic glycol that functions as a skin-conditioning agent. Glycols also give a slip to products (for easier application) and can help enhance the penetration of other ingredients.

Citric Acid – Extract derived from citrus and used primarily in small amounts to adjust the pH of products to prevent them from being too alkaline.

CI40800 – Beta CaroteneBeta-carotene is a precursor that helps form retinol (vitamin A). Typically, beta-carotene is potentially a good antioxidant and can reduce the effects of sun damage, although this benefit is dose dependent.

 

 

 

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And one more, that’s not marketed as a tattoo aftercare product but it is a good alternative to them  (and I’ve used it successfully): The Frank Body – Body balmContains ethically sourced beeswax, Not tested on animals, “No nasties”

Vitis Vinifera (Grape) Seed Oil – Emollient, non-fragrant plant oil that also has strong antioxidant properties.

Prunus Amygdalus Dulcis (Sweet Almond) Oil – is a non-volatile, non-fragrant oil extracted from the seeds of almonds and used as an emollient. Almond oil is a rich source of skin-repairing ingredients including triglycerides and several fatty acids (oleic, linoleic, and myristic among them).

Cocos Nucifera (Coconut) Oil – Non-volatile plant kernel oil whose high saturated fat content has emollient properties for skin. Coconut oil is a rich source of medium-chain fatty acids, also known as medium-chain triglycerides. Used by itself as a moisturizer, coconut oil’s effectiveness is similar to that of mineral oil.

Cetearyl Alcohol – Fatty alcohol used as an emollient, emulsifier, thickener, and carrying agent for other ingredients. Can be derived naturally, as in coconut fatty alcohol, or synthetically.

Beeswax (Cera Alba) – White beeswax is used in the preparation of emollient ointments.

Theobroma Cacao (Cocoa) Seed Butter – Oil extracted from cocoa beans, used as an emollient and with properties similar to those of other non-fragrant plant oils. Cocoa butter is a rich source of antioxidant polyphenols; in vitro research shows it helps improve skin elasticity and promotes healthy collagen production.

Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea Butter) – Plant lipid, extracted from the karite tree, that is used as an emollient in cosmetics. Shea butter is a rich source of antioxidants, including epicatechin gallate, gallocatechin, epigallocatechin, gallocatechin gallate, and epigallocatechin gallate, as well as quercetin.

Coffea Arabica (Coffee) Seed Oil – The concentrated oil from the coffee bean plant, which is green, not dark brown as this color doesn’t occur until coffee beans are roasted. In vitro tests on skin samples and sections of human skin have shown topical application can stimulate collagen and elastin synthesis as well as glycosaminoglycans, which help repair skin and contribute to a healthy barrier function. This non-fragrant plant oil also appears to stimulate pathways in skin that lead to greater moisture retention. Coffee seed extract and oil are a rich source of antioxidants whether consumed (as in beverages) or applied to the skin.

Vitis Vinifera (Grape) Fruit Extract – Skin-Conditioning Agent

Cannabis Sativa Seed OilBecause both hemp and marijuana are from the genus Cannabis, they are often thought (erroneously) to have similar properties. However, because hemp contains virtually no THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, it is not used as a drug of any kind. In cosmetics, hemp seed oil is used as an emollient.

Citrus Aurantium Dulcis (Orange) Peel Oil – It’s known for its anti-inflammatory qualities, helping detoxify congested skin,  soothing dry irritated skin in cases of dermatitis and acne the most and It increases the production of collagen. However, used topically its methanol content makes it potentially irritating for skin.

Euphorbia Cerifera (Candelilla) Wax – Extract derived from candelilla plants; used as a thickening agent and emollient to give products such as lipsticks or stick foundations their form.

Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride – Derived from coconut oil and glycerin, it’s considered an excellent emollient and skin-repairing ingredient. It’s included in cosmetics due to its mix of fatty acids that skin can use to repair its surface and resist moisture loss. Caprylic/capric triglyceride can also function as a thickener, but its chief job is to moisturize and replenish skin. This ingredient’s value for skin is made greater by the fact that it’s considered non-sensitizing.

Tocopherol (Vitamin E) – One of the most well-known and researched antioxidants, both when taken orally and when used in skincare products. If there were an antioxidant hall of fame, vitamin E would likely be its inaugural member (though do not take that to mean it is the “best” antioxidant—there is no single best, just lots of great options). It’s fat-soluble and available in various forms; the most biologically active form is alpha-tocopherol.

 

So there you have it! Go and get tattooed and make the right decision on what you put on your skin afterward! (And always use sunscreen after the healing process. ALWAYS!)

 

Most of the information about the ingredients were taken from the Paula’s Choice Cosmetic Ingredient Dictionary and the ones that weren’t there were taken from the one and only Wikipedia. This is not a sponsored post by any means, but if someone wants to give me free aftercare products I’m totally in!

So if you didn’t know… now you know.

 

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